A Review of Empty Promises by Pete Wilson

Ever think “if I just had more money, a bigger house, a better job, ________, life would be better?” You’re definitely not alone if you have! Everyone has fallen for an “empty promise” at least once in his or her life, but those who succeed are the ones who can break free of these lies and learn to live fulfilled lives without falling into the empty promise trap. 
Wilson, a pastor at Nashville’s Cross Point Church, has a a lot of valid points and is definitely knowledgeable about the topics he has written about, but I found myself distracted while reading this. Sometimes I didn’t feel like the book was cohesive and there was a little bit of jumping around. I also found myself wishing that he would revisit some of the stories he talked about in the book so readers could find out how those people fared. For example, he talked about one man who was so distraught over the loss of his job that he told Wilson he wanted to end his life. I assumed the man was okay (or else his story wouldn’t have been included in the book), but I would’ve like to have known more about the people that Wilson introduced. However, overall it was enjoyable, and I would recommend it, particularly to anyone who has ever fallen for any of the “empty promises” that he talks about. 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

A Review of The Beauty Book by Nancy Rue

Okay, I know I’m not the target audience for this title (it’s geared towards preteens), and I don’t have a daughter or any close younger female relatives that I need to share this advice with, but I still chose to review this book since I spent a semester interning for Nancy Rue. Even though I may be a smidge biased because she was one of the nicest people I’ve ever met, I went into reading this from the perspective of someone who does mentor young females, and this book is definitely a great resource for those folks. Combining practical knowledge with Scripture, Rue gives advice to “Lily” (of the Lily Series books that she has written) and her friends about learning to love themselves and their unique traits that God has given them. It’s a great message for any girl who has ever felt inadequate about her looks or has played the comparison game, and let’s face it, all girls have. If you’re around preteen girls or will be in the near future, then this book is worth checking out!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

A Review of Great Day Every Day by Max Lucado

Lately I had been in a bit of a rut. Nothing bad had happened, but I just felt “blah.” After reading this book, I feel like I have been transformed and put back on track! As Lucado points out, Psalm 118:24 says that THIS is the day the Lord has made, and I should rejoice and be glad in it, even if it’s tax day, final exam day, divorce day, etc. Every day is a gift, even when it seems like it is a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. We should rejoice in the big days and the little days. Lucado offers a “daily compass” after every chapter that helps readers adjust their attitudes and get back on the path to having a great day. I recommend this book to anyone who has ever had a bad day!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

A Review of Nearing Home by Billy Graham



Billy Graham is old. No, I’m not being callous or rude. He is old, 93 years old at the time the book was written, and he makes sure to remind everyone that growing old is not for sissies. In his old age, his thoughts have turned to what life is like for those who are getting close to the end of their lives, or “nearing home” in the sense of dying and going to Heaven. However, Graham points out that everyone, young and old, are nearing home as none of us know when our last moment will be. I am 28 years old, and many of his truths spoke to me in a way I did not expect them to. His chapter about influencing the impressionable really inspired me to make me want to be a better grandparent to my future grandchildren than my grandparents are to me. He stresses that older people have wisdom and character that younger people desperately need and they should use whatever means necessary to connect to the younger generation. He also talked about essential tools for Christians, such as God’s Word and fellowship. These truths are applicable for both younger and older folks. 


This is the first book I have read by Billy Graham, but I know it will not be my last! 


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

A review of Kaleidoscope by Patsy Clairmont

I received this book from BookSneeze several months ago and had the intent to read it and post a review by the following weekend.

The best laid plans and such…
In Kaleidoscope (a word that becomes increasingly more difficult to spell each time I write it), With chapter headings such as “Dem Bones” (related to Proverbs 15:30) and “Heavy Lifting” (related to Proverbs 10:29), Clairmont takes readers through a journey of the book of Proverbs using humor while still sticking to truth. At the end of each short chapter, she gives readers a few questions to consider (called “Bits and Pieces”) and related verses from other parts of the Bible.
I loved the fact that she laid it out from the beginning that she isn’t a Bible scholar, doesn’t know Greek or Hebrew, and sometimes makes up words that don’t exist! That sounded like something I would say, and it let me know from the beginning of the book that this wasn’t going to be some dry study of Proverbs that left me more confused than when I started. She was funny yet thought provoking, and her ideas seemed to be Biblically sound. I haven’t read anything else she has written, but after reading Kaleidoscope, I will check out more of her titles!
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”